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Access "The need for a cloud exit strategy and what we can learn from Nirvanix"

Published: 05 Dec 2013

The demise of Nirvanix drives home the need for organizations to craft a cloud exit strategy that will enable them to easily retrieve their data from a cloud storage service. By the time you read this, the Nirvanix Cloud Storage Network will likely be a fading memory despite its one-time membership in the exclusive club of economically successful cloud storage startups. In late September 2013, the cloud storage service provider told customers they had two or three weeks to clear their data off the Nirvanix cloud, leveraging high bandwidth LANs and/or the Internet to make their data transfers. That's rich. At T-1 speeds, moving 10 TB of data takes more than a year; at OC-193 speeds, the same transfer takes approximately four hours under ideal conditions. Nirvanix had been around for six or seven years, so some of its users have stored data considerably in excess of that volume in the vendor's cloud. One cloud on-ramp vendor reported that there was simply not enough bandwidth available to move all that data out in the time allotted. As of this writing, some of... Access >>>

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